Cycle power

Films such as ‘The theory of everything” and TV series such as ‘Grantchester’ imply that Cambridge is cycle heaven. And indeed, there are a lot of people on bikes; Cambridge has I believe the highest proportion of journeys to work on two wheels. But the infrastructure and traffic management lags the reality by a long way. While cycling across Parkers Piece or Midsummer Common is undoubtedly a joy, most city cycling in Cambridge involves the familiar mix of potholes, disappearing cycle lanes and an apparently mystical belief in the efficacy of faded white lines on Tarmac to provide a cycle-friendly city.

This may be now changing. The’DNA cycle path’ South from Addenbrookes offers great views as well as a path surface whose colours reference the four nucleotides of the BRCA2 gene, and the cycle way alongside the guided busway is another fast convenient route into and out of the city. And in the last few weeks work has begun on a segregated cycle lane along Hills Road. It’s only about a mile and will terminate at the Hills Road bridge – but it’s a start.

Promoting cycling and walking is more than a transport policy; it is a way in which cities can say something about what sort of place they are, and what sort of place they want to be. These are not (just) quality of life issues; for cities like Cambridge (and London) their economic futures will depend on their ability to attract and retain ideas, investment- and people

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